cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Highlighted
Viewer

Digital Certificate Date Rollover

I work within the DoD and I am required to publish my CISSP certificate to an internal organizational website, releasing to DMDC is not sufficient.  My three year cycle ended on April 30th 2019 so I expected that I would be able to pull a new digital certificate today, May 1st with an expiration date of 2022.  The expiration date still reflects 2019.  My AMF state that I'm current.  My CPEs reflect that I need 0 of the 120 total (doesn't appear to have rolled over yet).  What am I doing wrong?

3 Replies
Moderator

Re: Digital Certificate Date Rollover

@Grimes Thank you for your inquiry. To confirm, renewals are always processed on the first business day following the expiration date (today); however, it can sometimes take a little time to process, so they are not always available right away. Once renewals have been finished, you will receive a confirmation email with your new cycle dates. That is when your digital certificate will update. Members must also have met the three-year CPE and AMF requirements in order to renew.

 

Best Regards,

Amanda Vance

Viewer

Re: Digital Certificate Date Rollover

@amandavanceISC2 Thank you for the reply! I'll wait patiently for the date to process.
Advocate II

Re: Digital Certificate Date Rollover


@Grimes wrote:

I work within the DoD and I am required to publish my CISSP certificate to an internal organizational website, releasing to DMDC is not sufficient. 


 

Samuel,

The fact that a DoD organization requires another administrative process, supplying a copy of your CISSP certificate, over and above the DoD-wide DMDC-to-(ISC)2 access process, is a perfect candidate for submission to the DoD Fraud, Waste, & Abuse Hotline. It is a perfect example of governmental WASTE by unnecessarily duplicating standard department-wide processes. If you can estimate how many 8540-certified workers are in the organization, and the time it takes each to submit the certificates, and the time local organizational workers spend processing them, you can ball-park the wasted government resources to a dollar figure in your submission. The result could be a nice FWA Award check to you for your efforts. AND you would actually be streamlining the processes in your organization.

 

In many bureaucracies (not limiter to government) it is not unusual for local clerks to maintain, or even add, local procedures on top of improved broader processes, just because they "don't trust" the new (usually better) processes. Also, sometimes it is a form of job protection: "If I don't have to do that anymore, how will I justify my job?"

 

My suggestion to submit to FWA is not hyperbole.. they need to correct added cost they are incurring, and it really could mean some money for you.

 

Good luck!

 

 

 

 

Dr. D. Cragin Shelton, CISSP
Dr.Cragin@iCloud.com
https://CraginS.blogspot.com/
My Community Profile
My LinkedIn Profile