cancel
Showing results for 
Show  only  | Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
cancel
Showing results for 
Show  only  | Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Deetrain
Newcomer II

CC

I have the CC certification and I still cant get a computer job. Are there really more positions open the candidates for cyber security? It does not seem so to me. Wish I could get a cyber security job.

2 Replies
Alabama1997
Viewer II

I'm having the same problem. No one seems to know what the CC is and they don't seem to care.
JoePete
Advocate I


@Deetrain wrote:

I have the CC certification and I still cant get a computer job. Are there really more positions open the candidates for cyber security? It does not seem so to me. Wish I could get a cyber security job.


I apologize if the marketing may have led you to believe the CC would be all you need to land a job in the industry. It's a piece of the puzzle. This is a new certification to us (existing (ISC)2 members), too. It's not like this credential grew out of some member-based initiative. We're still figuring out what it tests and how to value it.

 

I would say, that you need three things to land a job in this industry. In order of priority:

  1. Experience. General IT skills, understanding networking, being able to communicate professionally. Sof skills and general business knowledge are very valuable. If you can't get those professionally, volunteer somewhere to build the resume.
  2. Human networking. Connect with your local (ISC)2 or ISSA chapter, meet people, ask questions, etc. For me to put you into a security role, I need to trust you. That's a lot easier if I have met you or you're being recommended by someone I know.
  3. Credentials. This is where the CC and other certs come into play. This circles back to #2. In talking with people, you can get a sense of what experience and credentials they want to see for specific types of jobs.

Good luck with your job search. I'm not sure about the methodology behind the claims that there are millions of job openings. I think that is based upon what some security managers would like to see, but what we have budget-wise and what we would like are often very different things. I also suspect the sampling may be biased. For example, I think we are also seeing a shift where security and IT are becoming decentralized or at least not growing in a central way. Where I see this going is a lot more cross-functional roles and a lot more delegating of security out to the workforce. We're already there with remote work and cloud-computing. Again, that returns to #1 and #2 on my list.