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Advocate I

IoT in Airports, A New Reference

While the Internet of Things (IoT) is getting a lot of attention among the general public for wearables and household items, the overall IT world is much broader. In the field of transportation the U.S National Academies of Science have just published a study on IoT in airports:

A Primer to Prepare for the Connected Airport and the Internet of Things

 

Description
TRB's Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Research Report 191: A Primer to Prepare for the Connected Airport and the Internet of Things introduces the concept of the Internet of Things (IoT) within the airport environment to leverage current and emerging technologies. IoT can be used to provide information and services to airport passengers with current and evolving technologies. Airports, airlines, and other stakeholders can use these innovative technologies and data to enhance the user experience and add value. Airport operators and their stakeholders can use this primer to understand the IoT environment and plan for implementation.

86 pages | 8.5 x 11
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17226/25299

 

You can buy a dead tree version or for free read online or download a PDF at

https://www.nap.edu/catalog/25299/a-primer-to-prepare-for-the-connected-airport-and-the-internet-of-...

 

A quick word search shows that security is in the book 43 times, but cyber only twice.

 

 

Dr. D. Cragin Shelton, CISSP
Dr.Cragin@iCloud.com
https://CraginS.blogspot.com/
5 Replies
Community Champion

Re: IoT in Airports, A New Reference

Thank you
Newcomer I

Re: IoT in Airports, A New Reference

This is an interesting set of summaries for case studies describing a journey toward a connected airport ecosystem. There are a few nods to the importance of including security in the planning and implementation processes.

 

One security-related assertion that I found interesting:

 

Researchers have reported the ability to take control of the steering and acceleration of cars via wireless hacking and even access crucial systems on airplanes from in-flight entertainment systems (Greenberg 2015; McGoogan 2016). Therefore, as IoT is adopted, safety, cybersecurity, and data privacy are all increasingly linked.


There are many known solutions to these issues. The same approach that has given aviation
such an impressive safety record over the years can help secure IoT. Just as no technology is
allowed to compromise the physical safety of an aircraft, no IoT adoption should be allowed
to outstrip the ability of airports, airlines, and others to protect data. Using known, trusted
technology vendors and designing IoT solutions with security and
privacy in mind from the start are key to robust security.

 

It seems somewhat misleading to say that there are many known solutions to IoT issues since I believe there are many IoT devices left to invent and some will likely have unique security implications.

Community Champion

Re: IoT in Airports, A New Reference

I agree, it is a problem which has been allowed to manifest itself, widely and almost invisible despite warnings and increasing attention to the problem.  Healthcare being one of those industries, whereby reduced costs of care is inherently built into system.  However, take case in hand :  Chris Roberts of https://www.newsweek.com/flight-airplanes-can-now-be-hacked-ground-cyber-expert-warns-962420, fame has gone on to also put out warnings to the DHS, who at last are taking heed of his previous warnings.

 

Regards

 

Caute_cautim

Newcomer II

Re: IoT in Airports, A New Reference

Thanks for sharing!

 

I really liked the mentioning of the "dead tree version" and the better alternatives Smiley Happy

 

IT Security is changing so fast all the time that keeping printed versions is cumbersome anyway.

Advocate I

Re: IoT in Airports, A New Reference


@solhuebner wrote:

Thanks for sharing!

I really liked the mentioning of the "dead tree version" and the better alternatives Smiley Happy

IT Security is changing so fast all the time that keeping printed versions is cumbersome anyway.


Sascha, et al.,

You're welcome.

(For the younger Millennials, generally defined as those who cannot read cursive, that translates to "Your welcome.") 

Also, note that the National Academies Press (NAP) has recently added e-book versions (epub and mobi) to the options for newer publications. Curiously, they now charge for the ebooks, just as for the printed dead tree books, while the online (html) and PDF options remain free.    

 

 

Dr. D. Cragin Shelton, CISSP
Dr.Cragin@iCloud.com
https://CraginS.blogspot.com/