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om
Newcomer II

Restrictions as an Associate of (ISC)2

Let me explain a bit about myself first:

 

I'm sixteen-year-old and I'm skipping my senior year at high school and directly going to a Cyber Security Engineering bachelor's program. I want to get everything (bachelors, masters, industry certifications) done as fast as possible.


I don't have enough experience to get the actual certification and I know it is against the code of ethics to say that I got the actual certification. Can I still put CISSP in the test score section on Linkedin? That way, I'm not saying that I have the certification but I'm not hiding the fact that I passed.

 

I'm just asking because I'm already on studying domain two and don't want to be disappointed when I pass. Or worse, be banned from (ISC)2

25 Replies
Community Champion

Re: Restrictions as an Associate of (ISC)2


@om wrote:

...I'm skipping my senior year at high school


Not having a high school diploma will close many doors for you that an "Associate of the (ISC)²" would not open back up. The thing about CISSP is that it demonstrates years and breadth of verified practical experience.  This is what "opens the door".  Passing the test without the experience will not even crack the door. 

 

I'm guessing that you find high school boring and you want to work ahead on more advanced topics that better hold your interest. That would be admirable and would be something I would look for in an employee.  However, skipping your senior year would cause me concern that it comes with an inability  to follow through on commitments, an unwillingness to work on "menial" tasks, and with a high risk of being ghosted. Ultimately, the concerns would likely cause me to move on to the next resume.

 

Instead, you might consider taking courses that offer both college and high-school credit through your senior year.  Our local high school offers this in conjunction with the local college and it has a number of advantages.  Beyond the greater challenges, you will finish college a semester or two earlier and will end up with less college debt.  Plus, it would make your resume stand out, in the same way as being an eagle scout, a shift manager at a burger joint, a class officer or graduating with honors.  

 

... Can I still put CISSP in the test score section on Linkedin?


In direct answer to your question, the answer is not known for sure.  The underlying rule is that you may not imply that you are a CISSP.  Even "publicly" saying you passed the CISSP exam is risky because not everyone knows that there are subsequent steps to becoming a CISSP and automated searches are likely to improperly hit on your profile.  It is known to be acceptable to mention in an interview that you passed the exam and have a career goal of gaining the necessary experience to obtain the certification itself.  Although you will see some mention of the phrase "Associate of the (ISC)² in pursuit of CISSP", on this community, the phrase has not been blessed by (ISC)², so there is no guarantee that it is safe to use.

om
Newcomer II

Re: Restrictions as an Associate of (ISC)2


@denbesten wrote:

Not having a high school diploma will close many doors for you that an "Associate of the (ISC)²" would not open back up. The thing about CISSP is that it demonstrates years and breadth of verified practical experience.  This is what "opens the door".  Passing the test without the experience will not even crack the door. 

I should have been more specific: I am receiving a high school diploma. I have all the required credits for graduation. In hindsight, I guess "skipping" wasn't the right word to use.


You're right. I'm jumping the gun a little too early. You guys are in a whole different league but I just want to try out the test and see how I do.

 


@denbesten wrote:

 

Instead, you might consider taking courses that offer both college and high-school credit through your senior year.  Our local high school offers this in conjunction with the local college and it has a number of advantages.  Beyond the greater challenges, you will finish college a semester or two earlier and will end up with less college debt.  Plus, it would make your resume stand out, in the same way as being an eagle scout, a shift manager at a burger joint, a class officer or graduating with honors.  

I've been doing that. My bad, I should have specified the exact details. I have 19 credits from AP courses and 8 from taking courses at my local community college (I have more from the community college but only 8 are acceptable for transfer credit to my college). I've created an excel document with all my required courses and one possible schedule which will allow me to finish in 2.5 years (5 normal semesters and 2 summer semesters). My college also offers an accelerated masters program. This means a completion time for masters of 1 year (1 normal semester and 1 summer semester).

 


@denbesten wrote:

In direct answer to your question, the answer is not known for sure.  The underlying rule is that you may not imply that you are a CISSP.  Even "publicly" saying you passed the CISSP exam is risky because not everyone knows that there are subsequent steps to becoming a CISSP and automated searches are likely to improperly hit on your profile.  It is known to be acceptable to mention in an interview that you passed the exam and have a career goal of gaining the necessary experience to obtain the certification itself.  Although you will see some mention of the phrase "Associate of the (ISC)² in pursuit of CISSP", on this community, the phrase has not been blessed by (ISC)², so there is no guarantee that it is safe to use.

Got it. Won't mention it on LinkedIn.

 

I've got some other questions as well:

 

Do the work experience waivers stack or can I only choose one? I can get a one year professional work experience waiver because I hold Security+. Will this prevent me from getting a waiver for completing my bachelor's?

 

Can an endorsement be signed by someone related to me? Like my parents? I know they have to be an (ISC)2 credential holder.

 

 

Thank you so much for the information!

Advocate I

Re: Restrictions as an Associate of (ISC)2


@om wrote:
...

...

Do the work experience waivers stack or can I only choose one? I can get a one year professional work experience waiver because I hold Security+. Will this prevent me from getting a waiver for completing my bachelor's?

 

You can have a year of experience waived for either a suitable degree OR an approved credential (not both):

 

https://www.isc2.org/Certifications/CISSP/experience-requirements

 

 

Can an endorsement be signed by someone related to me? Like my parents? I know they have to be an (ISC)2 credential holder.


 

The only criterion is the endorser needs to be a certified credential holder in good standing, so, yes, it could be a family member. Alternatively, you can ask ISC2 to act as your endorser:

 

https://www.isc2.org/Endorsement

 

Viewer III

Re: Restrictions as an Associate of (ISC)2

Within the Associate of (ISC)2 video they mention "stand out to employers" and "differentiate yourself from the pack". How are you supposed to do this after passing a certification such as CAP if you can't even think of mentioning it for fear of being banned?  What EXACTLY is approved to use as marketing for future jobs that would actually help you "stand out"?

Highlighted
Community Champion

Re: Restrictions as an Associate of (ISC)2

> om (Viewer) posted a new topic in Member Support on 05-13-2019 11:44 PM in the

>   I'm sixteen-year-old and I'm skipping
> my senior year at high school and directly going to a Cyber Security Engineering
> bachelor's program.

Don't do that. I did that. (Well, not the Cyber Security Engineering B. Sc. part:
they didn't exist back then.)

I'd take 20 years to explain why it's not a good idea.

> I want to get everything (bachelors, masters, industry
> certifications) done as fast as possible.

Yeah, my Dad gave me similar advice. Probably the worst he ever gave me. I'd
counsel patience.

> Can I still put CISSP in the test score section
> on Linkedin? That way, I'm not saying that I have the certification but I'm not
> hiding the fact that I passed.

Yeah, that should be fine.

>   I'm just asking because I'm already on studying
> domain two and don't want to be disappointed when I pass.

Have you studied "Security Engineering," by Ross Anderson?

======================
rslade@vcn.bc.ca slade@victoria.tc.ca rslade@computercrime.org
"If you do buy a computer, don't turn it on." - Richards' 2nd Law
"Robert Slade's Guide to Computer Viruses" 0-387-94663-2
"Viruses Revealed" 0-07-213090-3
"Software Forensics" 0-07-142804-6
"Dictionary of Information Security" Syngress 1-59749-115-2
============= for back issues:
[Base URL] site http://victoria.tc.ca/techrev/
CISSP refs: [Base URL]mnbksccd.htm
PC Security: [Base URL]mnvrrvsc.htm
Security Dict.: [Base URL]secgloss.htm
Security Educ.: [Base URL]comseced.htm
Book reviews: [Base URL]mnbk.htm
[Base URL]review.htm
Partial/recent: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/techbooks/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Slade
https://is.gd/RotlWB http://twitter.com/rslade
http://blogs.securiteam.com/index.php/archives/author/p1/

............
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Community Champion

Re: Restrictions as an Associate of (ISC)2

> om (Viewer) posted a new reply in Member Support on 05-14-2019 02:33 AM in the

>   Do the work
> experience waivers stack or can I only choose one? I can get a one year
> professional work experience waiver because I hold Security+. Will this prevent
> me from getting a waiver for completing my bachelor's?

Interesting question. I suspect you only get one year off the total, but
@Samantha_O, @amandavance, can you get this person in touch with someone
from the creds committee for a definitive answer?

>   Can an endorsement be
> signed by someone related to me? Like my parents? I know they have to be an
> (ISC)2 credential holder.

You got at least one parent who is a CISSP? That could come in very handy. You
planning on doing work study or volunteer work while you do your baccalaueate?

====================== (quote inserted randomly by Pegasus Mailer)
rslade@vcn.bc.ca slade@victoria.tc.ca rslade@computercrime.org
The Internet interprets censorship as damage and routes around it
- John Gilmore, Time, December 1993
victoria.tc.ca/techrev/rms.htm http://twitter.com/rslade
http://blogs.securiteam.com/index.php/archives/author/p1/
https://is.gd/RotlWB

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Community Champion

Re: Restrictions as an Associate of (ISC)2


@om wrote
I have all the required credits for graduation. 

Congratulations and good work!  Two other things I might suggest.  First, consider leaving time for an internship.  They can be great for bridging the gap between "too much book knowledge" and "not enough real-world experience".  Plus, it can potentially accrue towards the experience requirement.

 

Second, leave some time to have a life.  College is also about building friendships, learning to maturely interact with others with whom you disagree, exploring subjects beyond just that which you think you want today, and to a degree kicking back and learning how to live a balanced life.

 

AlecTrevelyan  properly addressed your other questions.  Do keep in mind that there is a 6 year limit for gaining the required 4 additional years of experience (beyond the one you already have for passing Security+), so don't waste your time "trying" too early.

om
Newcomer II

Re: Restrictions as an Associate of (ISC)2

@rslade 

Why specifically is it a bad idea? In my mind I don't want to sit around doing normal classes. I've exhausted all possible cyber security classes at my high school so the only thing left is to sit in English class all day.

 

No, I have not read that book. I am ordering right now though. Gotta learn everything.

om
Newcomer II

Re: Restrictions as an Associate of (ISC)2

@AlecTrevelyan 

That sucks. I wish I could have stacked them.

 

How does it work for (ISC)2 to be my endorser? It sounds like trying to get a college recommendation from the college that you are applying to.