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Contributor II

Re: Failed CISSP - big time disappointment

I've worked at an overachievers institute for 18 years now and so know from observation what happens when you provide exam scores to overachievers.. the conversation typically goes like this: "Hi Joe". "Hi Jane, whatsup?" "Nothing much really. Just passed my <fill in name of VERY difficult exam here>. Piece of cake." "Yeah, they make them too simple nowadays. So congrats. Er.. what was your score?" "98 percent" "Ah, good." "Er .. what was yours?" "Oh, 100 percent of course".

 

Imagine that. Passing a very difficult exam with a 98 percent score and still feeling like a looser..

 

 

 

--
Heinrich W. Klöpping, MSc CISSP CCSP CIPP/E CTT+
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Newcomer III

Re: Failed CISSP - big time disappointment

That would suck, for sure. My wife would say, "Bottom-line...does it say PASSED or FAILED?" 🙂. As we all know, when it gets to the interview...score means nothing and if by some weird circumstance the resume stated (CISSP; passed on [greater than 1] attempt) , I would see it as an opportunity to discuss and uncover the personality/character of the interviewee.
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Viewer

Re: Failed CISSP - big time disappointment

I also attempted CISSP on 21/08/2018 and failed. It is really a big disappointment as i worked very hard towards preparing for CISSP. The kind of questions i had faced during the CAT exam were really out of expectations. Though i was able to attempt all 150 Questions but the final result was fail. Now again i have to pay 699$ (Plus Tax) to sit for second attempt. This is really unfair. ISC2 should revisit this policy.

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Contributor I

Re: Failed CISSP - big time disappointment

Why do people think that ISC2 should revisit thier policy around paying and taking theexam - this the most normal thing in the world. @sandyshar - it really sucks to fail man - i sympathize and understand but why should ISC2 not bill you for the second attempt??? Let me try and give a very distant example.... - imagine you have an incredible fence around your house - everybody absolutely loves that fence and want to touch it and take pictures of it. Then you announce that you would take 100$ to allow someone to paint your fence - thousands of applicants come, if the one chosen fails - would you allow them to do it again for free? - It may sound irrelevant in the beginning but it's really the same thing - we want to have that cert so badly - it comes with a cost - in my opinion this is pure business - each fail generates money for ISC2 - they've got to be crazy to bill only the first attempt. In my opinion - this works as a motivator to some extend as well.

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Contributor II

Re: Failed CISSP - big time disappointment

@sandyshar- very sorry to hear you did not make it - yet.  There are two issues you seem to address: firstly that the exam did not match your expectations, secondly that you have to pay a lot of money to sit for the exam (again).

 

I do somewhat sympathise with the second issue; if you have to pay this yourself, it really is a significant amount of money. On the other hand, if you become a CISSP this immediately increases your market value, and I believe that the 1400 or thereabout  dollar you had to spent to become a CISSP - assuming you pass on second try - is still money well spent. Also, as a CISSP you should already have at least five years of cumulative, paid work experience in two or more of the eight domains of the (ISC)² CISSP Common Body of Knowledge (CBK). This usually involves getting a salary, and we are mostly paid quite well. Also, in many cases, the employer will pick up the bill. So, unless you are in a particularly odd situation, you should be able to raise the money, methinks. 

 

About the first issue you seem to raise: yes, the exam can throw you off a bit. I sat my exam in 2011 and also have the exact same type of recollection that  you seem to have: being somewhat surprised by the line of questioning, which was quite different from what I had expected. However, as a professional I am used to very many different ways customers can bring up issues and the many different cultures and communication styles involved. It is up to the CISSP to see through all that and give proper advice. The exam merely reflects this, methinks.

 

I really hope you will sit again and pass.

 

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Heinrich W. Klöpping, MSc CISSP CCSP CIPP/E CTT+