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Caute_cautim
Community Champion

Do we have too much?

Are we in the midst of the fourth battle zone, and do we need to change the way we tackle cybercrime?

 

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/fourth-battlezone-technology-steve-king/

 

Regards

 

Caute_cautim

Tags (1)
5 Replies
Steve-Wilme
Advocate I

True the market is over supplied with 'solutions' that perform the same or overlapping functions and it would be easy to get carried away evaluating which was best fit at any given point in time or panic buying.  It's simply the nature a capitalism for there to be many competing vendors.

 

But the point is probably that to judge defenders by their ability to keep every conceivable attack at bay isn't realistic.  You can have the best defenders is the world and still concede goals to the opposition.  Attack types are additive over time and the aim has to be to combat all the well known commodity attacks that could impact your organisation by carrying out your analysis of the threat landscape, continuing to examine the risks to your business and ensuring the effectiveness of controls in place.  Buying more and more tech is often a knee jerk reaction, and it's not sustainable.

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Steve Wilme CISSP-ISSAP, ISSMP MCIIS
JoePete
Contributor II


@Steve-Wilme wrote:

True the market is over supplied with 'solutions' that perform the same or overlapping functions and it would be easy to get carried away evaluating which was best fit at any given point in time or panic buying.  It's simply the nature a capitalism for there to be many competing vendors.


An interesting take. It prompted in my mind the question: "Is it the nature of capitalism that there will always be fat people?"  (I choose to avoid any self-incrimination on that query!) The challenge in security, not unlike the challenge in personal diet, is a combination of behavior and choices. It's very possible to safely and responsibly navigate the cyber world with little fanfare. But it takes a combination of patience and attentiveness that many lack. Just as someone on a healthy diet, with a little work and restraint, can navigate a food court, any individual, looking to be safe and secure online can do so. But maybe their phone lacks the apps of their neighbors, and their social-media footprint is non-existent, and rather than using the popular tools, they opt for the good ones, etc.

Caute_cautim
Community Champion

@JoePete @Steve-Wilme Is it a human condition, that we have become fat and lazy, and socially expectant that others will solve the problems, whilst others go plainly sailing through life, completely oblivious, unless something effects them personally?    Or is it a modern disease, which have evolved over time?

 

Regards

 

Caute_cautim

JoePete
Contributor II


@Caute_cautim wrote:

@JoePete @Steve-Wilme Is it a human condition, that we have become fat and lazy, and socially expectant that others will solve the problems


When Marie Antoinette uttered, "let them eat cake," supposedly she was sincere. It wasn't a statement of arrogance or disdain, just ignorance. She had been so surrounded by luxury that to her, if there was no bread, well then, certainly there would be cake.

 

I think wealth tends to breed stupidity. It's not a human condition; it's a financial one. If you don't have to suffer the consequence of your own thinking or your own choices, then you tend not to think twice about them or learn from them. In that regard, I'm not sure there is a capitalist connection - if anything the market should punish the careless. However, in that context, maybe it is the human condition. Take a look at the stock price of Equifax, Facebook, or others that appear to have blundered from an information security standpoint. Have they suffered, no. In our casino economy, there is no consequence because all today's bad news means is a good stock buy tomorrow.

Steve-Wilme
Advocate I

I think that historically bread and cake weren't that unalike.  Obviously, a different flour and there may be extra ingredients in cake, but not miles apart as a foodstuff.  She is suppose to have referred to Brioche, although some commentators claim it as false attribution.  But point taken, it's easier to buy in a solution that does far more than you could possibly want from it than design a bespoke architecture to achieve the same end.  To those with deep pockets this doesn't matter and just encourages feature bloat from security vendors.

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Steve Wilme CISSP-ISSAP, ISSMP MCIIS