cancel
Showing results for 
Show  only  | Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
cancel
Showing results for 
Show  only  | Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Highlighted
Newcomer I

COVID makes all business continuity pandemic planning redundant.

The #COVID issue stabs at our vulnerabilities and weaknesses, as our mortality is something we all tend to shy away from considering.

 

A threat, such as COVID-19, which can strike unseen, against which we have no real defence, and for which there is no cure, is for many the ultimate horror. Consequently, reactions are polarised into those who, in a knee-jerk reaction, feel a need to do something, like buy supplies, no matter how ineffectual, and those that bury their heads in the sand.

 

Moving away from the emotional, practically there are many issues which you should be considering from a business continuity perspective. At ISO³, that analysis which is needed to identify real world risks, is very much part of our DNA. Only after that can appropriate contingency planning be created, so do make contact, if you think we can help, at jmcgill@27701.co.uk.

 

However, the problem to be factored into contingency planning is, if one person, say, in an office of 200 contracts COVID, must everyone self-isolate, and if so, how do you continue to operate?

 

The NHS advice, which can be found here: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/coronavirus-covid-19/, suggests that someone who thinks they have been on contact with a person suffering from COVID should self-isolate for 14 days. Most people who get sick will recover from COVID-19, and recovery time varies and, for people who are not severely ill, may be similar to the aftermath of a flulike illness. People with mild symptoms may recover within a few days. People who have pneumonia may take longer to recover (days to weeks). In cases of severe, life-threatening illness, it may take months for a person to recover, or the person may die. Consequently, creating contingency plans has complexity.

 

#isotothepowerthree www.27701.co.uk #Cybersecurity #COVID #CCSP #BusinessContinuity #Data #Analytics #GDPR #ISC2

2 Replies
Highlighted
Influencer I

Re: COVID makes all business continuity pandemic planning redundant.

Fiddlesticks.

COVID-19 has a number of lessons for pandemic planning, but it certainly doesn't
make BCP redundant.

Check your supply chains. Find (and eliminate) single points of failure. Build
redundancy. Do succession planning. These are all part of a real BCP.

Now go wash your hands.

====================== (quote inserted randomly by Pegasus Mailer)
rslade@vcn.bc.ca slade@victoria.tc.ca rslade@computercrime.org
The trouble with having an open mind, of course is that people
will insist on coming along and trying to put things in it.
- Terry Pratchett
victoria.tc.ca/techrev/rms.htm http://twitter.com/rslade
http://blogs.securiteam.com/index.php/archives/author/p1/
https://is.gd/RotlWB

............
This message may or may not be governed by the terms of
http://www.noticebored.com/html/cisspforumfaq.html#Friday or
https://blogs.securiteam.com/index.php/archives/1468
Highlighted
Newcomer I

Re: COVID makes all business continuity pandemic planning redundant.

You misunderstand. I did not say that COVID made BCP redundant. I said that it made the conventional pandemic planning concepts redundant. These have always been based upon hit rates of infection and maximum values for statistical clustering. With the guidance from NHS and UKG for self-isolation, there is now a new perspective to consider.