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Community Champion

Re: CISSP "sample" questions

> OneOfTheMartins (Viewer) posted a new reply in Certifications on 02-20-2019

>   The way I see
> it, this is difficult, if not impossible, to answer.

Definitely difficult: not impossible. This is definitely going to be the most
difficult exam you've ever written.

> First, "ultimately
> responsible" would have to be defined. Second, responsibility can be (and almost
> always is) delegated from the top to the bottom of the pyramid. In a
> philosophical way, the one who delegates is still "ultimately" responsible

And that's the way to answer it.

> but
> in real-life scenarios, if your data is going to be hacked and you, as CXO,
> delegated the above responsibilities to, say, the data owner or just the plain,
> old security officer, it's those guys who fall on their swords, not you.

Yeah, we've all seen situation where the guys at the top wriggle out of their
responsibilities by throwing some underling under the bus. As I've said elsewhere,
don't concentrate too much on "it *could* happen this way" ...

>   This
> is not the type of question I'd want in my test (though I have a sneaking
> suspicion I will), and it doesn't really look useful, either - hackers don't
> give many fcuks, flying or otherwise, about wordplay.

It's not wordplay, in this case. It's an important point, and one that I've seen in
my consulting work. I recall one contract where they had a very serious problem.
I identified it and told them what they had to do to fix it. They didn't want to do
that. OK, my contract is over: I've done my part. That was the fix, but they
didn't like it. I didn't have to (well, couldn't) force them. Six months later they
had to sell out to a competitor. But that was their responsibility, and their choice.
Not my responsibility.

We tend to forget that, in security. We are the experts, we have the knowledge
and experience, and we are advising people who frequently have little or no clue
about the issues we face. We are responsible for giving our best advice. But it's
senior management who have ultimate responsibility, and sometimes they throw
our advice out the window. They have the final say.

And, as I've said elsewhere, "pick the management answer" is an important
(although not the only) tip for the exam.

====================== (quote inserted randomly by Pegasus Mailer)
rslade@vcn.bc.ca slade@victoria.tc.ca rslade@computercrime.org
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itself in our folly. - Horace, Epistles
victoria.tc.ca/techrev/rms.htm http://twitter.com/rslade
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Highlighted
Community Champion

Re: CISSP "sample" questions

Thank you sir.

Highlighted
Newcomer I

Re: CISSP "sample" questions


@dcontesti wrote:

Thank you sir.


Seconded. I'll keep this in mind, especially the "management answer" theory, when preparing for the exam.

Highlighted
Community Champion

Re: CISSP "sample" questions


@rslade wrote:

...it's just one that a surprising number of people get wrong....

This also serves as an example of why Psycho-analytics are performed on the exam  Over time, (ISC)² deletes questions which are regularly answered incorrectly by those who pass. So, if most people disagree with "D", the question will eventually get kicked out, regardless of if D is right or wrong.

 

Although this may seem like a harmful practice of "live patient trials", there are two mitigating factors.  First, new questions are not graded until they have passed muster and secondly, if you truly deserve the certificate (know your stuff, exceed the experience requirements and are able to "think like a manager") you will easily be able to afford a few "unjust" hits. 

 

Since your goal is to pass the test, there is more value in understanding why Rob selected "D" (even if incorrectly), than there is in defending "B".   The idea being that understanding another person's position helps you grow your knowledge, whereas defending a position simply cements your own belief.

 

On the other hand, if the goal is to "annoy Rob", have at defending "B". There is sport in that Smiley Happy.  

 

Highlighted
Community Champion

Re: CISSP "sample" questions

> denbesten (Advocate I) posted a new reply in Certifications on 02-22-2019 12:00

>   On the other
> hand, if the goal is to "annoy Rob", have at defending "B". There is sport in
> that .

It's people like you what cause unrest ...

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