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Associate of ISC2 - IT security job prospects?

I've read recently that you can get the CISSP without the five years experience.

 

Anyway would companies hire an entry level security analyst if they were an Associate of ISC2?

 

It will be a lot of work to study and pass this test, so before I consider that I need to find out if a company would even hire me.

 

I work in IT currently as basically tier 3 helpdesk. I have 3 years experience and I have Bachelor's in IT. I wonder if an employer would consider me if were an Associate of ISC2? Once I had a security job I don't think it would take long to earn full CISSP.

4 Replies
Contributor III

Re: Associate of ISC2 - IT security job prospects?

You might also look at qualification such as SSCP (as the experience qualifications are less and you may already meet them) or possible other courses such as CompTIA Security + or SANS courses to initially get into the InfoSec field.  Once you've worked in InfoSec for a while the CISSP should be easier as you'll be able to relate some of it to your work experience more readily.

 

 

-----------------------------------------------------------
Steve Wilme CISSP-ISSAP, ISSMP MCIIS
Advocate II

Re: Associate of ISC2 - IT security job prospects?


@Draught wrote:

I've read recently that you can get the CISSP without the five years experience.


No, not really; only if you have an academic degree that allows you to qualify with four years experience plus the degree.

 


@Draught wrote:

 

Anyway would companies hire an entry level security analyst if they were an Associate of ISC2?


An Associate of (ISC)2 tells people (those who care) that you are working on your professional development, which is a good thing. However, since (ISC)2 prohibits Associates from telling which of the many available certifications they are pursuing while an Associate, that designation does not really hint that you are seekg in  CISSP, or a CCSP, or an SSCP, or whatever.. I am not currently in a hiring position, but were  I, having an Associate status would not influence me beyond the above comment to hire someone.. I would be looking at technical training and experience to select entry level new hires.

 

...

I work in IT currently as basically tier 3 helpdesk. I have 3 years experience and I have Bachelor's in IT. I wonder if an employer would consider me if were an Associate of ISC2? Once I had a security job I don't think it would take long to earn full CISSP.


Dive into the details on the eight CBK domains for CISSP. You may find the you have been touching legitimate domain topics at Tier 3 level. Rarely will Tier 1 help desk staff be really involved in security, but a few Level 2, and often Level 3, have to deal with such issues.

 

Good luck.

 

 

Craig

 

 

 

 

Dr. D. Cragin Shelton, CISSP
Dr.Cragin@iCloud.com
https://CraginS.blogspot.com/
My Community Profile
My LinkedIn Profile
Viewer

Re: Associate of ISC2 - IT security job prospects?

With more research I see the CISSP is not meant for me. That is at least for a few more years.

I do have my the comptia certs Security+ (very easy) and CCNA. Basic certs. I'm working now on expanding my career out of helpdesk.

What really impresses me here is the educational level, I'm very impressed some have PhDs. I am considering a masters in cybersecurity that may be the next necessary step in my career.

For now though now I need to have the right job and experience level before I can even think about the CISSP. Thanks for your replies.
Advocate II

Re: Associate of ISC2 - IT security job prospects?


@Draught wrote:
With more research I see the CISSP is not meant for me. That is at least for a few more years.
I do have my the comptia certs Security+ (very easy) and CCNA. Basic certs. I'm working now on expanding my career out of helpdesk.

Jerry,

You really are on the right path, working to plan a career development path. Congratulations. I think you nailed it with, "That is at least for a few more years." Having a goal to attain CISSP as you move forward in experience, skills, and knowledge is excellent. 

As for skills development, I have for many years been a huge fan of the SANS courses, which make you work on hands-on new skills. A SANS course certificate, or even one of their certifications, is a very positive credential. That said, some of the best hands-on tech courses in live environments  happen at community colleges. Even though you already have your BS, such course can open new doors for hands on tech skill development.

 


@Draught wrote:
.... I am considering a masters in cybersecurity that may be the next necessary step in my career.

Excellent! There are many fine master's programs in cybersecurity, information security, etc. Research them and get recommendations, judging them on content, hands on versus theory only courses, cost, and convenience to you. If you can find a local program for in person classroom and lab work, that  may give you the best learning experience. That said, there are a lot of remote learning programs, both synchronous and asynchronous, that have fine content. Local programs in your city have the advantage of networking and reputation with local employers. 

 

Oon the subject of networking, look for local chapters of (ISC)2, ISSA, OWASP, and even IEEE and Computer Society. to  join and attend their meetings. You can get excellent advice on career development for professionals who take the time to come to those meetings.

 

Good luck, and keep the Community here informed as you move forward.

 

Craig

 

Dr. D. Cragin Shelton, CISSP
Dr.Cragin@iCloud.com
https://CraginS.blogspot.com/
My Community Profile
My LinkedIn Profile