cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Contributor I

Re: Anger management and security


@j_M007 wrote:
  1. If you're angry, take some time before furiously trolling the boards.
  2. [snip] Don't discount advice. 
  3. Realize that people usually don't mean to offend.[snip]

Fewer people seem to embrace courtesy these days; likely because many of our leaders think insulting and ridiculing their colleagues (political or commercial) is "good governance."

 


Wise words,three points worth expanding:

  1. If you can't control your emotions, security is not for you. The ability to diagnose and correct an issue requires a calm head. Flaming someone tends to undermine credibility, not enhance it.
  2. Advice. It's remarkable how often someone with less understanding and fewer credentials ambles onto a key issue that escapes many others. It's not that their full assessment is correct, but as they come at an issue from a differing expertise, they often see the thing others overlook.
  3. The absence of courtesy. Yes, at least in the US, our major parties set a poor example. I also suspect, though, that part of the snarkiness and insulting we see today is the inadvertent impact of the standardization of public education. We are now edging into a second generation of kids raised to believe that every question is to be met with one correct answer. Anyone outside that answer is "wrong." The creativity, the curiosity, the compromise of education has been tested out of our society. We are so data driven, especially in education, that we have become ignorant. This is not unlike the days of Galileo when straying from the ordained body of knowledge was ridiculed.
Highlighted
Community Champion

Re: Anger management and security

You make EXCELLENT points @JoePete !

 


@JoePete wrote:

:

  1. If you can't control your emotions, security is not for you. The ability to diagnose and correct an issue requires a calm head. Flaming someone tends to undermine credibility, not enhance it.
    In fact, it shows you are mot master of the situation. When you work in security, you want people not only to be physically secure, but psychologically and morally secure.

    In many jurisdictions, particularly civil law societies, the law is there to assure "peaceable enjoyment of life"; not only that, however, but it governs society, families, contracts and agreements -- it becomes more of a "social contract" view rather than a "me first; me only" view.

    Security, whether of information, property, persons, becomes exponentially difficult in localities without respect of individuals and collectives (orientation, creed, race, age, physical or mental infirmity, transience, etc.)
  2. Advice. It's remarkable how often someone with less understanding and fewer credentials ambles onto a key issue that escapes many others. It's not that their full assessment is correct, but as they come at an issue from a differing expertise, they often see the thing others overlook.

    If the great Socrates gave us the splendid paradox of (paraphrased), "The only thing I know is that I know nothing", then professional courtesy and ethics might lead us, too, to think and think again. It's hard, very hard, not to reach for a hammer when you need a screwdriver - because you're frustrated, angry, frightened, anxious.

  3. The absence of courtesy. Yes, at least in the US, our major parties set a poor example. I also suspect, though, that part of the snarkiness and insulting we see today is the inadvertent impact of the standardization of public education. We are now edging into a second generation of kids raised to believe that every question is to be met with one correct answer. Anyone outside that answer is "wrong." The creativity, the curiosity, the compromise of education has been tested out of our society. We are so data driven, especially in education, that we have become ignorant. This is not unlike the days of Galileo when straying from the ordained body of knowledge was ridiculed.

    Man you hit a nail on the head. When we go to school, the first day we ask "Why?", we are branded, morally harrassed, bullied, and browbeaten not to ask "stupid questions." 

    Only those who ask "stupid questions" make it through to ask "smart questions." Only when you get through who, what where, when, why can you get to how. How is sometimes the least of your concerns -- the other questions will help you prevent the brown stuff from hitting the fan. Provided that you asked and answered why you needed a fan in the first place! ;-)

What will help us not click on the link, get phished, conned or otherwise harmed begins by asking "Why?" If we can teach ourselves, our families and our principals, the power of "Why?", we will save ourselves and those with whom we live and work from more harm.

 

Thanks JoePete!

Community Champion

Re: Anger management and security

> JoePete (Contributor I) posted a new reply in Career on 10-03-2018 11:59 AM in

> If you can't control your emotions, security is not for you.

An excellent point, and, as you further note ...

>  Yes, at least
> in the US, our major parties set a poor example.

... currently illustrated by a spectacularly bad example from your country's political sphere ...


............
This message may or may not be governed by the terms of
http://www.noticebored.com/html/cisspforumfaq.html#Friday or
https://blogs.securiteam.com/index.php/archives/1468
Community Champion

Re: Anger management and security

It ironic to see that the troll has been the root cause of a positive impact on the community...  Man Wink

 

 

Shannon D'Cruz,
CISM, CISSP

www.linkedin.com/in/shannondcruz
Community Champion

Re: Anger management and security

No beavertails and hot chocolate for you my friend! You may even be cut off timbits and double-doubles!

 

https://beavertails.com/

https://www.timhortons.com/ca/en/index.php