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AlecTrevelyan
Community Champion

Re: Understanding Associate of (ISC)2 Status

You can find all of the answers to your questions in the links I've posted below, but I've also included some relevant pieces of information for you...

 

https://www.isc2.org/Certifications/CISSP/Experience-Requirements

 

A candidate who doesn’t have the required experience to become a CISSP may become an Associate of (ISC)² by successfully passing the CISSP examination. The Associate of (ISC)² will then have six years to earn the five years required experience.

 

https://www.isc2.org/Certifications/SSCP/experience-requirements

 

A candidate who doesn’t have the required experience to become an SSCP may become an Associate of (ISC)² by successfully passing the SSCP examination. The Associate of (ISC)² will then have two years to earn the one year required experience.

 

If you aren't able to earn one year of experience in at least one of the seven domains of the SSCP (1. Access Controls, 2. Security Operations and Administration, 3. Risk Identification, Monitoring, and Analysis, 4. Incident Response and Recovery, 5. Cryptography, 6. Network and Communications Security, 7. Systems and Application Security) in your current job then perhaps you could also work part time in a security role?

 

Part-Time Experience: Your part-time experience cannot be less than 20 hours a week and no more than 34 hours a week.

 

1040 hours of part-time = 6 months of full time experience
2080 hours of part-time = 12 months of full time experience

 

Or another option would be if you have a suitable bachelor's degree (or whatever your regional equivalent is):

 

Candidates may satisfy the one year work experience requirement if they earn a degree from an accredited college or university or regionally equivalent education program. For purposes of certification, (ISC)² looks for the following characteristics of an approved cybersecurity degree:

 

1) The degree originates from a cybersecurity program which addresses cyber, information, software and infrastructure security topics within its requirements;

 

OR

 

2) Is one of the following preapproved degree programs:

 

Computer Science
Computer Engineering
Computer Systems Engineering
Management Information Systems (MIS)
Information Technology [IT]

 

The list of preapproved degree programs will be updated periodically.

 

Althaeis
Newcomer I

Re: Understanding Associate of (ISC)2 Status

I currently have Associate of (ISC)² Toward SSCP, but I just finished all the cpe requirements across the 3 year cycle, what do I need to do to get it changed to the Certification? or will it happen when I hit the date I originally took the exam?

AlecTrevelyan
Community Champion

Re: Understanding Associate of (ISC)2 Status

Some points you should note:

 

  1. The Associate for SSCP only last for a maximum of 2 years and that's a fixed term as opposed to a revolving cycle - the term "3-year cycle" only applies to the full certification
  2. Associates have a "suggested" annual requirement of 15 CPEs so if you are still an Associate in the second year supposedly you'd still need to submit 15 CPEs even if you'd submitted 30+ in the first year
  3. The purpose of the Associate programme is to allow you to gain the required work experience to qualify for the full certification which for SSCP is 1 year - work experience is gained through employment not through earning CPEs
  4. The point of earning the CPEs is to allow you to keep the Associate status so that you can have time to gain the work experience
  5. Once you have gained the required work experience you need to submit an endorsement application through the member portal and have that application approved to be granted the full certification

 

amandavanceISC2
Moderator

Re: Understanding Associate of (ISC)2 Status

@Althaeis Thank you for your inquiry. I am happy to look into your profile and provide more information on how to request full certification. Please email me directly from your primary email address on file and include your (ISC)² ID number.

 

I look forward to hearing from you.

 

Best Regards,

Amanda Vance

avance@isc2.org

Askiff
Viewer II

Re: Understanding Associate of (ISC)2 Status

So I recently passed the exam in November and there is no information on the next steps or the process. I have co-workers who have passed and said they received a packet and are required to submit their resume and get an endorsement. For an associate member there is no information on anything of the sort. I already have 2 years of experience and a degree but there is no information on if I am supposed to submit that information or anything. Will I receive a packet and require an endorsement and am I just supposed to resubmit for full certificate and keep track of my experience? I do think there should be more information out there on the process once you become an associate other then my required CPEs which is the only information I have.  

Thank you,

Alaura

Kaity
Community Manager

Re: Understanding Associate of (ISC)2 Status

Hello @Askiff - I'm sending you a private message! The associate program can be a bit confusing, but basically, you will have a window of time to earn the necessary experience to submit to the endorsement process to become a full member. More information is available here in the meantime - https://www.isc2.org/Certifications/Associate

Melleive
Newcomer I

Re: Understanding Associate of (ISC)2 Status

How do I get the Associate badge for my CISSP? It said it would appear when my first certification period opened but it’s still not loaded in Acclaim. Also, I still haven’t received any sort of certificate stating I am associate CISSP. I need that for my employer as proof status.  

FHaskell
Viewer II

Re: Understanding Associate of (ISC)2 Status

I passed the CISSP exam but don't have the requisite experience to claim the certificate, putting me in the associate territory. I work for a defense contractor and all our job posts run off of the DoD 8570. This specifically calls for "CISSP (or associate)" in several of their requirements. According to ISC2, this doesn't exist and if I use it I'll get banned. How can I apply to a DoD job with the credentials I have earned, without getting hit for implying I have a certificate that I do not?

CraginS
Defender I

Re: Understanding Associate of (ISC)2 Status


@FHaskell wrote:

I passed the CISSP exam but don't have the requisite experience to claim the certificate, putting me in the associate territory. I work for a defense contractor and all our job posts run off of the DoD 8570. This specifically calls for "CISSP (or associate)" in several of their requirements. According to ISC2, this doesn't exist and if I use it I'll get banned. How can I apply to a DoD job with the credentials I have earned, without getting hit for implying I have a certificate that I do not?


Just apply for the job and, once you are officially designated by (ISC)2 as such, state your status as "Associate of (ISC)2."

The original Associate was only applicable to CISSP, and not to the only other cert  back then, the SSCP. And the original DoD requirement was for CISSP. DoD added the "or Associate" language when they realized they were putting middle managers into positions that needed the cert, were able to pass the exam, but did not have 5/4 years of experience. 

  Since then (ISC)2 has added many more certs, and made the general Associate of (ISC)2 status valid for passing any of the exams, but lacking the experience years. And DoD has failed to update the language in their tables to account for that change.

  SO, as the HQ said, do not use the phrase "Associate CISSP" or anything similar; in fact, fo not use CISSP at all. Claim the properly earned Associate of (ISC)2 and you will be fine. Also, do not put in writing, either in yoru resume or cover letter, which exam you passed ot get Associate status. However, if you have an interview, you can tell them then which certification you are pursuing as an Associate. You can also stay in you resume that you are working toward "professional certification in information assurance," a careful wording that avoids using CISSP.

 

 

Good luck!

 

Craig

 

D. Cragin Shelton, DSc
Dr.Cragin@iCloud.com
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berninator
Viewer II

Re: Understanding Associate of (ISC)2 Status

There are two things you can do here:

 

1. List what DoD 8570 levels you qualify for on your resume. Such as, "qualified to serve in roles up to IAT Level III, IAM Level III, and IASAE Level II." DISA's guidance is clear - passing the exam is what qualifies you under 8570, not necessarily the actual certification. 

 

2. When you get your Credly badge, put a link to your badge on the resume. The reason why is that your Associate of (ISC)² badge actually lists what exam you passed. In fact, there are seven different Associate of (ISC)² badges on Credly, one for each possible exam. (ISC)² has made it very clear that you are not allowed to use word CISSP anywhere on your resume until you have the actual CISSP cert. However, (ISC)² is also the one who issued you that badge and has stated that you are allowed to include that badge on your LinkedIn and resume. 

 

Are these as good as being able to just outright say "I passed the CISSP exam"? No, definitely not. And you're putting a lot of hope into someone being able to "pick up what you're putting down". But it's pretty much the most you're able to do, so you might as well try.