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Highlighted
Community Champion

Re: Making coworkers accountable

Personally,  I would have gracefully accepted the offer to install the PMK, thanked him the next day for minimizing the outage and then leveraged this newly-learned tidbit the next time a printer issue arose.  Do keep in mind that although he may know how to install a PMK, it does not necessarily follow that he has the skills to diagnose the need for a PMK. Negative reinforcement will never solve that.  Instead, give accolades for the bits he has figured out on his own and informally mentor to stretch his skill set a bit further.  We have also found that checklists are a great tool for helping our level-1 support staff improve their support abilities.

 

Given the apparent importance of printers in your organization, you might consider proactive maintenance as printers reach their service intervals instead of waiting for complaints.  You can usually get the current page count using SNMP, printer web interfaces or enterprise consoles and use that to estimate when maintenance is due.  Proposing such a scheme to management (complete with estimated costs and benefits) is how one professionally adds value to ones employer and sets oneself up to for raises/promotions, etc. 

 

Although blowing up at a coworker might make one feel "empowered", it also risks becoming an HR issue because it can also be viewed as demeaning, "not a team player" and if it gets bad enough, "Hostile work environment".   I have seen people lose raises, promotions and even jobs when those terms enter the picture.

Highlighted
Contributor II

Re: Making coworkers accountable

Let me qualify the "I let him have it," as I kept my composure while outlining my dissatisfaction.  My conclusions are sound and documented.

Thanks for the feedback!

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Eric Geater, CISSP
I've always said, "There's nothing an agnostic can't do if he really doesn't know whether he believes in anything or not."
Highlighted
Community Champion

Re: Making coworkers accountable

Another way you can use this situation to your advantage is to have it as an interview answer if asked about working with difficult people. I would continue to try to "train" them and use that also. An interviewer will be more impressed that you tried to work amicably with them and helped them grow (even if just a little) than you being able to prove you were "right".

 

I always try to find out how I can use a situation, even a bad or frustrating one, to my advantage in a future scenario.

 

 

Highlighted
Community Champion

Re: Making coworkers accountable

This is like the Win Win game, give a little and watch the response, if negative - change the approach until it resonates in a form the Co-worker can accept and recognise, you are giving a little and then they might modify their own behaviour.  Respect is hard fought, but one definitely needs to know when to watch and observe and simply wait for the right time to re-engage at a later time, as necessary.

 

Regards

 

Caute_cautim

Highlighted
Contributor II

Re: Making coworkers accountable

UPDATE TO THIS THREAD

When I wrote this thread six months ago, I was probably still a bit excited and agitated from gaining the CISSP.  I've settled down since then, at least by knowing the sky wasn't actually falling in our enterprise.

I sat down with my supervisor last week, and I asked him questions that I wouldn't have asked six months ago: "What does my coworker own?  What processes does he have full and complete responsibility for?  And what metrics are in place to demonstrate his accountability for those processes?"  In the ensuing conversation, I presented my concerns as things which affect our business culture and productivity.

Toward the end of our chat, my supervisor was taken aback at some of what I described, saying "we're all learning at this."  He admitted that I.T. has a reduced visibility, and that's something we must amend.

 

I also offered a metrics solution by suggesting we start a new messaging campaign for all helpdesk requests to be sent to a unified email address, so that we can leverage our helpdesk ticketing software.  This way my coworker can triage every message, no matter the scope, and hand them off to the appropriate parties.  In time, a review would determine how many things he could handle as they come in.

Thanks to everyone who responded!!

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Eric Geater, CISSP
I've always said, "There's nothing an agnostic can't do if he really doesn't know whether he believes in anything or not."
Highlighted
Community Champion

Re: Making coworkers accountable

 

Nice going! I'm assuming you've been asked to submit a proposal, after which they'll consider the implementation of a solution.

 

 

Shannon D'Cruz,
CISM, CISSP

www.linkedin.com/in/shannondcruz
Highlighted
Contributor II

Re: Making coworkers accountable

Good question.  Tomorrow's IT roundtable will be our first meeting back after holiday vacations and my sidebar chat, so I'll be very interested to hear if my supervisor addresses this new narrative.

 

My fallback position, if he chooses to ignore it, is that our department needs to cover its customer requirements, and the single best way is through tracking data, which can affirm a need for accountability.  I don't care who drives the discussion, as long as we have it.

---
Eric Geater, CISSP
I've always said, "There's nothing an agnostic can't do if he really doesn't know whether he believes in anything or not."